Search the Site with 
General Characteristics Crew List Memorabilia About the Ship's Name Image Gallery to end of page

USS Thomas Hudner (DDG 116)

USS THOMAS HUDNER is one of the ARLEIGH BURKE Flight IIA guided missile destroyers and the first ship in the Navy named after Captain Thomas Hudner.

General Characteristics:Awarded: February 28, 2012
Keel laid: November 6, 2015
Launched: April 23, 2017
Commissioned: December 1, 2018
Builder: Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine
Propulsion system: four General Electric LM 2500 gas turbine engines
Propellers: two
Length: 508,5 feet (155 meters)
Beam: 67 feet (20.4 meters)
Draft: 30.5 feet (9.3 meters)
Displacement: approx. 9,200 tons full load
Speed: 32 knots
Aircraft: two SH-60 (LAMPS 3) helicopters
Armament: one Mk-45 5"/62 caliber lightweight gun, two Mk-41 VLS for Standard missiles and Tomahawk ASM/LAM, one 20mm Phalanx CIWS, two Mk-32 triple torpedo tubes for Mk-50 and Mk-46 torpedoes, two Mk 38 Mod 2 25mm machine gun systems
Homeport: Mayport, Fla.
Crew: approx. 320


Back to topback to top  go to endgo to the end of the page



Back to topback to top  go to endgo to the end of the page

Crew List:

This section contains the names of sailors who served aboard USS THOMAS HUDNER. It is no official listing but contains the names of sailors who submitted their information.


back to top  go to the end of the page



Back to topback to top  go to endgo to the end of the page

About the Ship's Namesake:

Thomas J. Hudner Jr., a naval aviator who retired as a captain, received the Medal of Honor from President Harry S. Truman for displaying uncommon valor during an attack on his wingman, the first African American naval aviator to fly in combat, Ensign Jesse L. Brown. During the Battle of Chosin Reservoir in the Korean War, anti-aircraft fire hit Brown's aircraft, damaging a fuel line and causing him to crash.

After it became clear Brown was seriously injured and unable to free himself Hudner proceeded to purposefully crash his own aircraft to join Brown and provide aid. Hudner injured his own back during his crash landing, but he stayed with Brown until a rescue helicopter arrived. Hudner and the rescue pilot worked in the sub-zero, snow-laden area in an unsuccessful attempt to free Brown from the smoking wreckage.

After receiving recognition for his heroism, Hudner remained on active duty, completing an additional 22 years of naval service during which his accomplishments include flying 27 combat missions in the Korean War and serving as the executive officer aboard the USS KITTY HAWK (CVA 63) during the Vietnam War.

Hudner died at Concord, Mass., on November 13, 2017. He was interred at Arlington National Cemetery on April 4, 2018.


Back to topback to top  go to endgo to the end of the page



Back to topback to top



Back to Destroyers list. Back to ships list. Back to selection page. Back to 1st page.