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USS Farragut (DDG 99)

USS FARRAGUT is the 21st Flight IIA ARLEIGH BURKE - class guided missile destroyer and the fifth ship in the Navy named after Admiral David Glasgow Farragut.

General Characteristics:Awarded: March 6, 1998
Keel laid: January 9, 2004
Launched: July 23, 2005
Commissioned: June 10, 2006
Builder: Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine
Propulsion system: four General Electric LM 2500 gas turbine engines
Propellers: two
Length: 508,5 feet (155 meters)
Beam: 67 feet (20.4 meters)
Draft: 30,5 feet (9.3 meters)
Displacement: approx. 9,200 tons full load
Speed: 32 knots
Aircraft: two SH-60 (LAMPS 3) helicopters
Armament: one Mk-45 5"/62 caliber lightweight gun, two Mk-41 VLS for Standard missiles and Tomahawk ASM/LAM, one 20mm Phalanx CIWS, two Mk-32 triple torpedo tubes for Mk-50 and Mk-46 torpedoes, two Mk 38 Mod 2 25mm machine gun systems
Homeport: Mayport, Fla.
Crew: approx. 320


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Crew List:

This section contains the names of sailors who served aboard USS FARRAGUT. It is no official listing but contains the names of sailors who submitted their information.


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USS FARRAGUT Cruise Books:


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About the Ship's Name:

David Glasgow Farragut, born at Campbell's Station, near Knoxville, Tenn., 5 July 1801, entered the Navy as a midshipman 17 December 1810. When only 12 years old, he was given command of a prize ship taken by ESSEX, and brought her safely to port. Through the years that followed, in one assignment after another he showed the high ability and devotion to duty which was to allow him in the Civil War to make an overwhelming contribution to victory and to write an immortal page in the history of not only the United States Navy but of military service of all times and nations.

In command of the West Gulf Blockading Squadron, with his flag in HARTFORD he disproved the theory that forts ashore held superiority over naval forces, when in April 1862 he ran past Forts Jackson and St. Philip and the Chalmette batteries to take the great city and port of New Orleans (a decisive event in the war) and later that year passed the batteries defending Vicksburg. Port Hudson fell to him 9 July 1863, and on 5 August 1864 he won a great victory in the Battle of Mobile Bay, passing through heavy minefields (the torpedoes of his famous quotation) as well as the opposition of heavy batteries in Forts Morgan and Gaines to defeat the squadron of Admiral Franklin Buchanan.

His country honored its great sailor by creating for him the rank of Admiral, never before used in the United States Navy. Admiral Farragut's last active service was in command of the European Squadron with FRANKLIN as his flagship, and he died at Portsmouth, N.H., 14 August 1870.


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USS FARRAGUT Image Gallery:



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