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USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109)



USS JASON DUNHAM is one of the ARLEIGH BURKE Flight IIA guided missile destroyers and the first ship in the Navy named after Corporal Jason L. Dunham, USMC.

General Characteristics:Awarded: September 13, 2002
Keel laid: April 11, 2008
Launched: August 2, 2009
Commissioned: November 13, 2010
Builder: Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine
Propulsion system: four General Electric LM 2500 gas turbine engines
Propellers: two
Length: 508,5 feet (155 meters)
Beam: 67 feet (20.4 meters)
Draft: 30,5 feet (9.3 meters)
Displacement: approx. 9,200 tons full load
Speed: 32 knots
Aircraft: two SH-60 (LAMPS 3) helicopters
Armament: one Mk-45 5"/62 caliber lightweight gun, two Mk-41 VLS for Standard missiles and Tomahawk ASM/LAM, one 20mm Phalanx CIWS, two Mk-32 triple torpedo tubes for Mk-50 and Mk-46 torpedoes, two Mk 38 Mod 2 25mm machine gun systems
Homeport: Norfolk, Va.
Crew: approx. 320


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Crew List:

This section contains the names of sailors who served aboard USS JASON DUNHAM. It is no official listing but contains the names of sailors who submitted their information.


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About the Ship's Coat of Arms:

The Shield:

The colors dark blue and gold represent the United States Navy. The two chevronels in base recall Corporal Dunhamís rank. The scarlet pale represents the Marine Corps and refers to the trouser stripe worn by Non Commissioned Officers. The Marine Corps Non Commissioned Officers sword on the stripe is point down, signifying Cpl Dunhamís sacrifice of his life to protect his troops. The helmet of antiquity recalls the service traditions of brotherhood which hold true today and recalls the incident of enemy attack on Cpl Dunhamís squad during which he used his helmet to contain a grenade and covered it with his body to protect his squad at the cost of his own life. The purple detail on the helmet refers to the Purple Heart Medal awarded Cpl Dunham. The distinctive shield shape is that used on the state arms of New York, Cpl Dunhamís home state. The gold mullet in dexter chief signifies the loss of Cpl Dunham to his service and his family. The gold border denotes the unity and cohesion of Marine Corps service members which characterize the force and clearly influenced Cpl Dunhamís action in defense of his troops.

The Crest:

The decorations awarded to Corporal Dunham are represented along with the eagle, globe and anchor insignia of the United States Marine Corps; the inverted mullet symbolizes the Medal of Honor, the nationís highest decoration for valor awarded to Cpl Dunham for his sacrifice in protecting his squad, and the Combat Action Ribbon, awarded to him along with the Purple Heart Medal, which is referenced on the antique helmet appearing on the shield.


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About the Ship's Name:

Corporal Jason L. Dunham was born on 10 November 1981 in Scio, New York. On April 14, 2004, Corporal Dunham was manning a checkpoint in Karabilah, Iraq, when an insurgent leapt from his car and began choking Corporal Dunham. A scuffle ensued as two Marines approached to help. Reportedly, the last words from Corporal Dunham were, ďNo, No. Watch his hand.Ē Suddenly, the insurgent dropped a grenade. Corporal Dunham took off his Kevlar helmet, dropped to the ground, and covered the explosive as best he could.

The blast seriously wounded all 3 Marines. Eight days later, Corporal Jason L. Dunham died at Bethesda Naval Hospital from wounds he received in the incident. He was 22. Corporal Dunham made the ultimate sacrifice, and in doing so saved the lives of his fellow Marines. Due to his actions on that fateful day, Corporal Dunham has been awarded the Medal of Honor.

Medal of Honor Citation:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as Rifle Squad Leader, 4th Platoon, Company K, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines (Reinforced), Regimental Combat Team 7, First Marine Division (Reinforced), on 14 April 2004. Corporal Dunham's squad was conducting a reconnaissance mission in the town of Karabilah, Iraq, when they heard rocket-propelled grenade and small arms fire erupt approximately two kilometers to the west.

Corporal Dunham led his Combined Anti-Armor Team towards the engagement to provide fire support to their Battalion Commander's convoy, which had been ambushed as it was traveling to Camp Husaybah. As Corporal Dunham and his Marines advanced, they quickly began to receive enemy fire. Corporal Dunham ordered his squad to dismount their vehicles and led one of his fire teams on foot several blocks south of the ambushed convoy. Discovering seven Iraqi vehicles in a column attempting to depart, Corporal Dunham and his team stopped the vehicles to search them for weapons. As they approached the vehicles, an insurgent leaped out and attacked Corporal Dunham. Corporal Dunham wrestled the insurgent to the ground and in the ensuing struggle saw the insurgent release a grenade. Corporal Dunham immediately alerted his fellow Marines to the threat. Aware of the imminent danger and without hesitation, Corporal Dunham covered the grenade with his helmet and body, bearing the brunt of the explosion and shielding his Marines from the blast. In an ultimate and selfless act of bravery in which he was mortally wounded, he saved the lives of at least two fellow Marines.

By his undaunted courage, intrepid fighting spirit, and unwavering devotion to duty, Corporal Dunham gallantly gave his life for his country, thereby reflecting great credit upon himself and upholding the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.


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The photo below was taken by Michael Jenning and shows the JASON DUNHAM at Naval Base Norfolk, Va., on October 28, 2013.



The photos below were taken by Michael Jenning and show the JASON DUNHAM at Naval Base Norfolk, Va., on May 8, 2014.



The photos below were taken by me and show the USS JASON DUNHAM at Naval Base Faslane, UK, on October 4 and 5, 2014, prior to her participation in Exercise Joint Warrior 14-2. For the exercise, the US Navy sent USS VICKSBURG (CG 69), USS JASON DUNHAM and USNS KANAWHA (T-AO 196) to Scotland.



The photos below were taken by me and show the JASON DUNHAM leaving Faslane, UK, to join Exercise Joint Warrior 14-2 on October 6, 2014.



The photos below were taken by me and show the JASON DUNHAM arriving at Kiel, Germany, on June 19, 2015, after participating in BALTOPS 2015.



The photos below were taken by me on June 19-21, 2015, during USS JASON DUNHAM's port visit to Kiel, Germany, after her participation in BALTOPS 2015.

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The photos below were taken by Michael Jenning and show the JASON DUNHAM at Naval Base Norfolk, Va., on October 6, 2015.



The photos below were taken by Michael Jenning and show the JASON DUNHAM at the Marine Hydraulics Industries (MHI) Ship Repair & Services shipyard in Norfolk, Va., on April 13, 2016.



The photos below were taken by Michael Jenning aboard the USS JASON DUNHAM during Fleet Week in Baltimore, Md., on October 14, 2016.

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The photos below were taken by Michael Jenning and show the JASON DUNHAM departing Baltimore, Md., on October 17, 2016, after participating in the city's Fleet Week.



The photos below were taken by Michael Jenning and show the JASON DUNHAM at Naval Base Norfolk, Va., on October 4, 2017.



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